goldenrod running

I learn by going where I have to go...

...welcome to my most recent endeavor of organizing thoughts, happenings, and art of all sorts.

my creations and art things are in my portfolio thru the art link on the left.



Read the Printed Word!

  1. We need to talk about Anne Frank

    Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave. That is the story of the Holocaust of European Jewry, and that is the story of the persecution and murder of all Europeans (the disabled, Romani, Irish Travelers, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists) who failed to fit into Nazi racial and ideological constructs.

    And we would all do well to remember that.”

    historicity-was-already-taken:

    As of this writing, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has sold over one million copies, and holds a place on several bestseller lists. The film adaptation of the book has made over two hundred million dollars in the domestic and foreign market. The book and the movie tell the story of two…

  2. liquid lichen #adventures in the green room

    liquid lichen #adventures in the green room

  3. #artmotherfuckers

    #artmotherfuckers

  4. #rose #garden #coral #natureneedsnofilter

    #rose #garden #coral #natureneedsnofilter

  5. @crafty_contraceptives not your mother’s cross stitch #reproductiverights #hobbylobby #sexpositive #radicalembroidery #embroidery #crossstitch #feminist

    @crafty_contraceptives not your mother’s cross stitch #reproductiverights #hobbylobby #sexpositive #radicalembroidery #embroidery #crossstitch #feminist

  6. foreverpensive:

swag
  7. http://fuckyeahsexeducation.tumblr.com/post/93262986573/doula-a-birthing-attendant-who-is-professional

    THIS JUST MADE ME SO HAPPY! GO DOULAS GO!

    fuckyeahsexeducation:

    Doula: A birthing attendant who is professional trained in childbirth who provides emotional, physical and informational support to the pregnant person who is expecting, is experiencing labor, or has recently given birth so that they have a positive experience. There are birth doulas, postpartum…

    • mqandmrs:

Alicia’s American Sign Language Dictionary.  Alicia is showing you four important signs in ASL:  ”I Love You,” “Queer,” “Bisexual,” and “Transgender.” 
When you’re talking about someone’s identity, make sure to only use words they’re OK with. 
If anyone has suggestions to improve these pages, they are very much welcome. 
Mq. & Mrs. is a queer/trans coloring book in progress that only uses real people as models.  New pages are published every Sunday at noon. Interested in modeling for a page? See our site for more info.  

it’s also worth noting that many ASL signs for ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities are crude. (off the top of my head signs I learned for ‘black’ ‘jewish’ ‘girl’ ‘boy’ ‘chinese’ ‘japan’ etc. were beyond offensive but my teacher was very dated in her knowledge vocabulary/culture)
If anyone has updates (SE, PSE, ASL) I’d love to know! 
    • mqandmrs:

Alicia’s American Sign Language Dictionary.  Alicia is showing you four important signs in ASL:  ”I Love You,” “Queer,” “Bisexual,” and “Transgender.” 
When you’re talking about someone’s identity, make sure to only use words they’re OK with. 
If anyone has suggestions to improve these pages, they are very much welcome. 
Mq. & Mrs. is a queer/trans coloring book in progress that only uses real people as models.  New pages are published every Sunday at noon. Interested in modeling for a page? See our site for more info.  

it’s also worth noting that many ASL signs for ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities are crude. (off the top of my head signs I learned for ‘black’ ‘jewish’ ‘girl’ ‘boy’ ‘chinese’ ‘japan’ etc. were beyond offensive but my teacher was very dated in her knowledge vocabulary/culture)
If anyone has updates (SE, PSE, ASL) I’d love to know! 
    • mqandmrs:

Alicia’s American Sign Language Dictionary.  Alicia is showing you four important signs in ASL:  ”I Love You,” “Queer,” “Bisexual,” and “Transgender.” 
When you’re talking about someone’s identity, make sure to only use words they’re OK with. 
If anyone has suggestions to improve these pages, they are very much welcome. 
Mq. & Mrs. is a queer/trans coloring book in progress that only uses real people as models.  New pages are published every Sunday at noon. Interested in modeling for a page? See our site for more info.  

it’s also worth noting that many ASL signs for ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities are crude. (off the top of my head signs I learned for ‘black’ ‘jewish’ ‘girl’ ‘boy’ ‘chinese’ ‘japan’ etc. were beyond offensive but my teacher was very dated in her knowledge vocabulary/culture)
If anyone has updates (SE, PSE, ASL) I’d love to know! 

    mqandmrs:

    Alicia’s American Sign Language Dictionary.  Alicia is showing you four important signs in ASL:  ”I Love You,” “Queer,” “Bisexual,” and “Transgender.” 

    When you’re talking about someone’s identity, make sure to only use words they’re OK with. 

    If anyone has suggestions to improve these pages, they are very much welcome. 

    Mq. & Mrs. is a queer/trans coloring book in progress that only uses real people as models.  New pages are published every Sunday at noon. Interested in modeling for a page? See our site for more info.  

    it’s also worth noting that many ASL signs for ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities are crude. (off the top of my head signs I learned for ‘black’ ‘jewish’ ‘girl’ ‘boy’ ‘chinese’ ‘japan’ etc. were beyond offensive but my teacher was very dated in her knowledge vocabulary/culture)

    If anyone has updates (SE, PSE, ASL) I’d love to know! 

    (via fuckyeahsexeducation)

  8. brofisting:

    i was literally just lying in bed thinking “oh my god, i am so inexplicably sad right now, it feels like ive been hollowed out and am going to be sick” and then i sat up like “wait. thats hunger. i have yet to eat dinner”

    SO REAL. this is why we wait until after the SO and I have nommed before figuring out what to do with ourselves

  9. [picture of gob and george michael bluth in a store. caption: “say what you will about america—13 bucks still gets you a hell of a lot of mice.”

    [picture of gob and george michael bluth in a store. caption: “say what you will about america—13 bucks still gets you a hell of a lot of mice.”

    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.
    • chavisory:


Sensory Overload and how to cope.
(click on images to zoom)

Transcriptions for sharing!
Sensory Overload And how to cope
SLIDE 1 Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:
Fibromyalgia (FM)
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Autistic spectrum disorders
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
Synesthesia
SLIDE 2 Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.
Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.
Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.
Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.
Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.
Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.
Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.
SLIDE 3Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:
Irritability
Angry outbursts
Overexcitement
High energy levels
Fidgeting and restlessness
Shutting down
Refuses to interact and participate
Low energy levels
Sleepiness/fatigue
Avoids touching/being touched
Covers eyes around bright lights
Covers ears to close out sounds or voices
Difficulty speaking
Poor eye contact
Muscle tension
Difficulty concentrating
Jumping from task to task without completing
Complains about noises not affecting others
Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Difficulty with social interactions
SLIDE 4There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:
Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
Rest before big events.
Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
Restrict time spent on various activities.
Select settings to avoid crowds and noise
One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.
SLIDE 5It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
Calming, focusing music works for some.
Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.
SLIDE 6What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?
Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.
Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.
Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.
SLIDE 7
Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.
If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.
Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.
SLIDE 8
When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.
If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.
SLIDE 9
To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:
Recognize the symptoms of overload.
Remove yourself from the situation.
Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.
Relax your body and calm yourself down.
Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.

    chavisory:

    Sensory Overload and how to cope.

    (click on images to zoom)

    Transcriptions for sharing!

    Sensory Overload And how to cope

    SLIDE 1
    Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:

    Fibromyalgia (FM)

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Autistic spectrum disorders

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    Synesthesia

    SLIDE 2
    Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.

    Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.

    Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.

    Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.

    Sight:  Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.

    Smell and taste:  Strong aromas or spicy foods.

    Touch:  Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.

    SLIDE 3
    Obviously, everyone reacts differently to sensory overload.  Some behavioral examples are:

    Irritability

    Angry outbursts

    Overexcitement

    High energy levels

    Fidgeting and restlessness

    Shutting down

    Refuses to interact and participate

    Low energy levels

    Sleepiness/fatigue

    Avoids touching/being touched

    Covers eyes around bright lights

    Covers ears to close out sounds or voices

    Difficulty speaking

    Poor eye contact

    Muscle tension

    Difficulty concentrating

    Jumping from task to task without completing

    Complains about noises not affecting others

    Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch

    Difficulty with social interactions

    SLIDE 4
    There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:

    Create a more quiet and orderly environment—keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.

    Rest before big events.

    Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.

    Restrict time spent on various activities.

    Select settings to avoid crowds and noise

    One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.

    SLIDE 5
    It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.

    Remove yourself from the situation.

    Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.

    Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.

    Calming, focusing music works for some.

    Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.

    SLIDE 6
    What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?

    Recognize the onset of overload.  If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.

    Reduce the noise level.  If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them to somewhere more quiet.  Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing.  If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.

    Do not touch or crowd them.  Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch—being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload.  If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.

    SLIDE 7

    Don’t talk more than necessary.  Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else.  Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.

    If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up.  This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting.  If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it.  A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.

    Don’t react to aggression.  Don’t take it personally.  It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation.  Aggression often occurs because you tried to touch/restrain/block their escape.

    SLIDE 8

    When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards.  It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload.  If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.

    If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them.  Restraint is likely to make their overload worse.  Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head.  It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.

    SLIDE 9

    To summarize—Remember the 5 R’s:

    Recognize the symptoms of overload.

    Remove yourself from the situation.

    Reduce the stimulus causing the overload.

    Relax your body and calm yourself down.

    Rest yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.

    (Source: recovery-community, via hellomynameismaddy)

  10. (Source: decoratedskin, via cwnerd12)

  11. ubykotex:

You should always be proud to talk about your period! Here’s four reasons why: http://bit.ly/okaytotalk

    ubykotex:

    You should always be proud to talk about your period! Here’s four reasons why: http://bit.ly/okaytotalk

    (via becauseiamawoman)

  12. "At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
    In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
    Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
    When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely face of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare."
    Caitlin Moran  (via dylinquent)

    (Source: lustsandluxuries, via babbbbletower)